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New Orleans History

Where to Find Relics from New Orleans’ 1984 World’s Fair

By Matt Haines | November 22, 2021

The 1984 World’s Fair provided cherished memories for a generation of New Orleanians, but it also helped transform our city.

My Granny was a Vampire-Smuggling Casket Girl: a (possibly) true story

By Michael DeMocker | October 26, 2021

Our story begins with the Casket Girls of Ursuline Convent – a towering building that still stands in the French Quarter where nuns, ghosts and vampires are said to coexist.

Nazis, Intimidation, and Espionage: How a St. Charles Mansion Became Part of a WWII Conspiracy

By Kate Taylor | August 5, 2021

It sounds like the plot of a Hollywood summer blockbuster — a vast campaign of espionage and propaganda taking place on U.S. soil that must be stopped before the fabric of America unravels. But this story isn’t fiction. Carried out from a stately St. Charles mansion, Baron Edgar von Spiegel, German Consul to New Orleans, undertook his campaign of intimidation, espionage, and misinformation.

How a Black Civil War Hero’s funeral paved the way for second lines

By Matthew Hinton | June 25, 2021

In an attempt to earn the full freedom and equality of the white caste, Captain André Cailloux fought in the Battle at Port Hudson, Louisiana, in 1863 becoming the first widely publicized Black Civil War hero. His funeral was the largest procession the city had seen at the time, and is considered by many to be the predecessor to modern-day jazz funerals and second lines.

New Orleans Hosted a World’s Fair in 1884, But Relics Still Dot the City If You Know Where to Look

By Matt Haines | June 14, 2021

Here’s a list of some of the most notable remnants from the 1884 World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition.

Mr. New Orleans

Stories of the New Orleans mafia as told by Cajun gangster Frenchy Brouillette

By Matt Haines | May 5, 2021

#ReadDat: ‘Mr. New Orleans’ tells the story of a grittier city through the eyes of the mafia

Faulkner House Books

What building has the most stories? The Faulkner House Books, of course.

By Marielle Songy | April 30, 2021

Down an alley, just off Jackson Square, is a book lover’s sanctuary, where one can find a curated selection of Southern literature and classics. Located at 624 Pirates Alley, Faulkner House Books is in a townhouse that was built in 1837 that in the 1920s was home to famed writer, William Faulkner.

Dorothy Mae Taylor

Dorothy Mae Taylor’s impact: much more than ending Mardi Gras discrimination

By Matt Haines | March 30, 2021

New Orleans’ schools, our recreation department, state legislature, City Council, public monuments, health care and even Mardi Gras — these are all parts of our hometown that are better, more equitable and fairer thanks in large part to the work of Dorothy Mae Taylor.