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Jennifer Larino

Jennifer Larino is a New Orleans-based journalist and Mid-City resident. She most recently covered business as a lead reporter at NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune. Her work has appeared in national and local outlets, including Entrepreneur, New Orleans CityBusiness and The Orlando Sentinel. When not writing, she loves traveling and making pretty Mardi Gras costumes.

A grab-and-go food guide to the MSY New Orleans terminal

By Jennifer Larino / May 24, 2022

Time. Most of us don’t have a lot of that. Even less so when we’re rushing to make a flight. There are still plenty of tasty options for the less leisurely travelers among us, though it helps to know where to find them.

Collapse, COVID, and uncertainty: how businesses near the Hard Rock Hotel collapse site are surviving

By Jennifer Larino / June 1, 2020

It’s not yet clear how and when theaters, arenas and similar venues will re-open amid COVID-19.

Is a plastic-free Mardi Gras possible?

By Jennifer Larino / February 24, 2020

Is a greener, plastic-free Mardi Gras possible? Sustainability advocates are optimistic, though they acknowledge it will require a major cultural shift. The answer is more complicated for krewes and riders.

A traveler’s guide to New Orleans’ new airport terminal

By Jennifer Larino / November 5, 2019

Here’s everything you need to know about the new MSY, including how to get there, what to expect at TSA and dining options.

New $42M solar power plant in N.O. East could change how we think about our power supply

By Jennifer Larino / November 4, 2019

How much should we be willing to pay for solar? And who should own it? The East is poised to be on the front line of that debate.

New Orleans East will get its own Carnival parade in 2020. Here’s how it happened.

By Jennifer Larino / October 24, 2019

Nefertiti will debut in February as the first krewe to roll in New Orleans East in decades, a throwback to a tradition of neighborhood parades that has largely faded from the modern Mardi Gras experience.